Australians filing their tax returns this week in a bid to get $2,580 back to help with living expenses are more likely to run into trouble with the law.  The beginning of the new fiscal year on July 1 is often seen as a sign that individuals must file their annual tax returns without delay in order to get their tax deductions (pictured is a stock photo)

Why filing your tax returns in the next two weeks could get you in big trouble with the law?

Australians filing their tax returns in the coming weeks – hoping for a $2,580 refund to help with the cost of living busy – could be in legal trouble with more chance of errors.

The beginning of the new fiscal year on July 1 is often seen as a sign that individuals must file their annual tax returns immediately in order to get their tax credit.

Middle- and middle-income earners will get $1,500 back in tax offsets on top of another $1,080 in tax cuts introduced by the previous coalition government.

Of inflation the hot, run-of-the-mill Australians would crave $2,580 in tax credits to cope with the rising cost of living.

However, many employers have yet to submit their staff’s earnings to the tax authorities.

Details on stocks, bank interest, cryptocurrency and private health insurance payments are also being finalized.

Australians filing their tax returns this week in a bid to get $2,580 back to help with living expenses are more likely to run into trouble with the law. The beginning of the new fiscal year on July 1 is often seen as a sign that individuals must file their annual tax returns without delay in order to get their tax deductions (pictured is a stock photo)

Penalties for lying on a tax return

CAREFREE: 25 percent

RECKLESS: 50 percent

ON PURPOSE: 75 percent

RECIDIIST: 95 percent

Source: H&R Block analysis of Australian tax office fines for over-claiming

The Australian Revenue Commissioner’s assistant commissioner Tim Loh told Daily Mail Australia that those who tried to get in first were more likely to make a mistake and face an audit.

“The ATO often sees errors in early July as people rush to file their tax returns and forget to include income from government agencies, banks, dividends from stocks and cryptocurrency exchanges,” he said.

‘People who stay in July are twice as likely to have their declaration adjusted by the ATO.

“If people choose not to wait for prefill information, they increase their risk of ATO examination.”

The IRS won’t start processing returns until July 7 and would not pay the first set of returns until July 16.

Electronically submitted returns take 12 business days to process.

Employers have until July 14 to provide their staff’s pre-populated payroll information to the ATO, with this method replacing the old printed group certificate.

The IRS uses data matching technology to pre-populate information about wages, bank interest and dividends.

Mark Chapman, H&R Block’s director of tax communications, said those who filed their returns early should be aware that pre-populated data submitted to the ATO, from employers to banks, often took several weeks to complete.

The Australian Tax Office's assistant commissioner, Tim Loh, told Daily Mail Australia that those who tried to get in first were more likely to make a mistake and undergo a tax audit.

The Australian Tax Office’s assistant commissioner, Tim Loh, told Daily Mail Australia that those who tried to get in first were more likely to make a mistake and undergo a tax audit.

“Not all pre-fill data will be available until the end of July or early August, meaning early renters will have to check their returns against their own source data rather than relying on pre-fill,” he told Daily Mail Australia.

“That’s why it pays to be careful in July. At the beginning of August, the pre-filling is more reliable.’

Mr Chapman said Australians who use an accountant to file their tax returns should also ensure they have all their earnings details to hand, from their job to their investments.

“That said, if you engage a tax advisor, they will always check that all the information expected to be there is there and will ask for your own source data if anything seems to be missing,” he said.

Settlement of low and middle income tax

Individuals who earn up to $126,000 and complete their tax returns for fiscal year 2021-22 are eligible for the basic low and middle income tax credit of up to $1,080.

Former treasurer Josh Frydenberg’s May budget supplemented that with a $420 tax offset towards living expenses.

That means 4.6 million Australians earning between $48,000 and $90,000 will receive $1,500 in tax compensation, while an additional 1.8 million will receive $675 from $37,000 to $48,000.

The tax offset, introduced in the October 2020 budget, expired on June 30, meaning individuals will not receive it in 2022-23.

With inflation soaring, ordinary Australians would crave $2,580 in tax credits to cope with the rising cost of living (pictured is a Woolworths supermarket in Sydney)

With inflation soaring, ordinary Australians would crave $2,580 in tax credits to cope with the rising cost of living (pictured is a Woolworths supermarket in Sydney)

Tax Cuts

In addition, Australians will also receive tax cuts in fiscal year 2021-22 compared to what they would have paid in 2017-18 thanks to measures introduced by the previous coalition government.

Those who earn between $48,000 and $90,000 get $2,580 back, when the $1,500 in tax offsets were combined with the $1,080 in tax cuts.

Australians have until October 31 to file their tax returns if they do it themselves rather than through an accountant.

However, banks have until October 31 to inform the tax authorities about the interest payments their customers have received.

Individuals have until May to complete their tax returns if they register with an accountant.

Individuals earning up to $126,000 who complete their tax returns for the past fiscal year 2021-22 are eligible for a tax credit of up to $1,500 - with a $420 markup added to the $1,080 base tax credit

Individuals earning up to $126,000 who complete their tax returns for the past fiscal year 2021-22 are eligible for a tax credit of up to $1,500 – with a $420 markup added to the $1,080 base tax credit

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